Reclaiming my geek
Oh god I need to share this with the world

a-spork-with-feelings:

kewilom:

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No words neeeded

reblog if you are a NERD who loves DRAGONS

dracowife:

Kind of a nerd (yarn nerd?) and am in love with a particular dragon… That count? dracoprimus

I most definitely count.

toriandrelativedimensionsinspace:

nepetalast:

sheyna-sterling:

pissy-little-aquarius:

why are parents allowed to yell and scream at their children and call them names and just make them feel like shit in general…

but when kids try to defend themselves…. its disrespectful?

what kind of fucking shit parents do you have

is this a new thing to you

Sometimes I forget there are parents that don’t so that.

I’m 22 and they still do this kind of shit.

I’m 42, and my mother still does this. It kinda saddens me how much of my parenting style is basically “that crappy thing your mother just said to to you? don’t you #$%#$%’ing dare say that to YOUR kids!”

silverstar415850:

vladimirnootin:

aboutwhitewomen:

vladimirnootin:

sixpenceee:

10 year old Yemeni girl smiling after she was granted a divorce from her husband- a 30 year old man
Here’s what I found after looking into it. 
Nujood Ali was nine when her parents arranged a marriage to Faez Ali Thamer, a man in his thirties. Regularly beaten by her in-laws and raped by her husband, Ali escaped on April 2, 2008, two months after the wedding. 
On the advice of her father’s second wife, she went directly to court to seek a divorce. After waiting for half a day, she was noticed by a judge, Mohammed al-għadha who gave her refuge. He had both her father and husband taken into custody.
Indeed, publicity surrounding Ali’s case is said to have inspired efforts to annul other child marriages, including that of an 8 year old Saudi girl who was allowed to divorce a middle-aged man in 2009.
But in 2013 Ali reported to the media that her father had forced her out of their home and is withholding her money granted by publishers. Her father has also arranged a marriage for her younger sister, Haifa.
Also this girl has her own book

I just want some feminists to focus more on this than on defending Zoe Quinn and Anita Sarkeesian.

Realistically, what can they do? Most of the feminists that you likely encounter are based in USA, Canada, maybe UK. What can they do to affect attitudes and policies in a place like Yemen?

They can raise awareness. Tumblr is a global site where you can donate to people in many countries to aid them. A very good thing they can do, for one, is set up donations for this kid or other kids. They can put efforts to start up shelters for such incidents. There’s a lot of things western feminists can do. This post only has almost 9k posts, whereas a post about male tears has 36K. 

This hurt deep in my soul

wait, why can’t feminists, or anybody, stand up for Ali AND Quinn and Sarkeesian?

silverstar415850:

vladimirnootin:

aboutwhitewomen:

vladimirnootin:

sixpenceee:

10 year old Yemeni girl smiling after she was granted a divorce from her husband- a 30 year old man

Here’s what I found after looking into it. 

Nujood Ali was nine when her parents arranged a marriage to Faez Ali Thamer, a man in his thirties. Regularly beaten by her in-laws and raped by her husband, Ali escaped on April 2, 2008, two months after the wedding.

On the advice of her father’s second wife, she went directly to court to seek a divorce. After waiting for half a day, she was noticed by a judgeMohammed al-għadha who gave her refuge. He had both her father and husband taken into custody.

Indeed, publicity surrounding Ali’s case is said to have inspired efforts to annul other child marriages, including that of an 8 year old Saudi girl who was allowed to divorce a middle-aged man in 2009.

But in 2013 Ali reported to the media that her father had forced her out of their home and is withholding her money granted by publishers. Her father has also arranged a marriage for her younger sister, Haifa.

Also this girl has her own book

I just want some feminists to focus more on this than on defending Zoe Quinn and Anita Sarkeesian.

Realistically, what can they do? Most of the feminists that you likely encounter are based in USA, Canada, maybe UK. What can they do to affect attitudes and policies in a place like Yemen?

They can raise awareness. Tumblr is a global site where you can donate to people in many countries to aid them.

A very good thing they can do, for one, is set up donations for this kid or other kids. They can put efforts to start up shelters for such incidents.

There’s a lot of things western feminists can do. This post only has almost 9k posts, whereas a post about male tears has 36K.

This hurt deep in my soul

wait, why can’t feminists, or anybody, stand up for Ali AND Quinn and Sarkeesian?

pyrrhiccomedy:

moniquill:

accioharo:

blackandyellowdoodles:

justacynicalirishman:

babyshibe:

doctorgaylove:

thecoppercow:

That Mysterious “S” Thing We Used to Draw (by the1janitor)

We used to draw this as kids and it’s always confused me. It still really bothers me tbh.

This is really creepy tbh.

yeah we used to draw these! around 2002. at the time i was told it was like the slipknot logo but now i know it’s totally not. but we did used to get in trouble for drawing them.

we never got in trouble with them. I had them all over my school planner lol. 

(We did call them ‘super S’) 

There’s this awesome book I read called ‘The People in the Playground’ which concerns the observations of an anthropologist on children’s folklore: the stuff that kids independently teach one another in school yards and playgrounds that has no real connection to adult lore and media. This is a great example of it, as are hand clapping and jump rope verses.


If you can finish the lines “Miss Mary Mack Mack Mack all dressed in black black black…” or ‘Hinky Pinky Ponky, Daddy had a donkey…”or “Miss Suzy had a steamboat…” or “Engine Engine number nine…”

stop and think about where you learned them.


It probably wasn’t from an adult or out of a book or in any formal way. It was from another kid; someone a grade ahead of you or someone’s older sibling or something. Who learned it the same way.

This is CHILD lore. Sometimes a fad will come and go in a single age cohort, sometimes it’ll last for generations. It’s kind of awesome.

The idea of child lore and a distinct child culture is really interesting, especially when you consider that children have a few traditions that go back hundreds of years.

For example: did you ever play “Quaker’s meeting?” Quaker’s meeting has begun, no more laughter, no more fun…that dates back two centuries

And of course there’s “Ring around the rosie,” which goes all the way back to the time of the black plague.

Children pass these things down among themselves as part of a legacy they lack the context to fully understand; but you could say the same thing about most adult traditions. That unbroken chain of shared knowledge connects their play to the play of children from hundreds of years ago, without any adult input or encouragement.

That’s cool.

I remember this from the 80’s

clearlypositive:

people who don’t get excited about tv shows make me uncomfortable

onceuponabloodynight:

:’DDDDD on We Heart It.
reblog if you are a NERD who loves DRAGONS